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, and areas that are in mississippi and alabama, as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next five days, enough to cause flooding concerns. mara's already complained offair but it's a chilly morning in the northeast and the great lakes. >> it's like fall. i have my sweater under the desk, it's chilly. >> 24 hours ago i opened the windows in my house and last night i had to shut them. >> some people love it, but i say let summer run its course. >>> prince william prepares caring for his newborn to military duty. >>> who are the highest players in the nfl this year? >>> and a new study that shows which drivers are jerks. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. cheryl burke is cha-cha-ing in depend silhouette briefs for ch
i was even lower than a working bee. mississippi for the first part of the summer knowing that there was lots of talk about the march on washington, not knowing if it would ever come to be but mississippi was the last of the states where there had been no demonstrations. but not mississippi. halfway through the summer, i got a call saying "it's going to happen, eleanor. and buy yard is going to do it." he said, "come on up if you want to work on the staff." byyard us are on the. states who could have organized that march. >> ifill: what do you mean? >> there were a set of skills that we had no reason to have so nurtured. there had never been a mass march on washington that anyone. there had been all kind ofmarchs march. what would it take to organize such a march with no experience, no precedent to draw from. >> ifill: no social media, no flash mobs. with only telephones and the usual old-fashioned 20th century means of communication. on.l, first it took it took someone -- and i think buyard put it all in one. he had been a pass f.i.s.edworln civil disobedience in leavenwo
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
understand that we have a lot of partners there joining us. .ost: brookhaven, mississippi republican. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing pictures and to do all and how kinds of things. i do not think you all should be doing this. stoph y'all would please showing this on tv. terrorists watch tv. i am highly upset. host: go ahead. guest: maybe i can give you can' come for. this is at a 30,000 foot level. there are much more details that go into it than what i can even describe your today. that there is a great deal of security in and around the ports and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. host: all the information is public information? guest: it is. host: at what point does the government come into play? what it is here, who takes over security? host: security is a joint venturer. when it is under water it is mainly coast guard. when it reaches the earth it is port authority and customs. reporting scanning and certain it isners that open it, federally managed. the state portion as to make sure they are secure. republican caller. hi,
in this effort. >> host: republican line, brookhaven, mississippi. >> caller: yeah, this is mary. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing security staff, showing security staff. you are showing pictures and everything. expected tell them how to get badges and all kinds of things. i don't think john should be doing this. i wish you would please, please telling this on tv. terrorist watch tv. i'm highly upset. >> host: abcaeight. all right. >> guest: maybe i can give you a little bit of comfort. where i have done today is the 30,000-foot level. much, much more detail that goes into it than what i can't even describe today. rest assured that there is a great deal of security in and around the port and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. it does need funding to continue that effort. >> host: of the information you told us i assume is public information. >> guest: it is. >> host: the role of the coast guard and security. at what point did they come into play? and then once the ship is here, who takes over security at that point? >> guest: securit
? guest: it is certainly a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not kno
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
that these were phoneo scandals like the mississippi river they keep rolling and keeps getting bigger. i think the republicans are doing well. i think they are very methodical and are not hysterical. they are pursuing it and it will take time but they are pulling on it a thread at a time. >> what about that? if it starts expanding beyond the irs that starts to become more of a problem for the administration. >> they are not supposed to share information but the threat would be that they are sharing information for political purposes to undermine conservatives. in this situation that is not clear. they shared it with the enforcement division of the federal elections commission. so there could be a legitimate reason to see if somebody has tax exempt status to see what they are requesting and then requesting similar status from irs. we don't know. but the idea is and i think that there was testimony from lerner that there had been no sharing of data whatsoever. so now we have an exception to the rule apparently and of course that compounds all the suspicious about lerner and the fact that she has
gain, long-term rip. finally the ugly, a failed attempt to outrun the law. a suspect in mississippi tried to jump into a river to get away from police but there was one problem. he was still wearing handcuffs and then he needed to be rescued. >> time for your favorite viral video of the week. was it the bowler whose chances for a perfect game was shattered by a malfunctioning machine, the naked fan at the concert or a door -- dog who opened the door for his three-legged friend? >> rachel says i'm glad he got tackled. that is what should when you do something stupid like that. >> kathy tweets how cute is that? what a moment. it looks like man's best friend is also dog's best friend. >> the web page poll was tied between the bowler and the dog. >> have a good weekend. "fox & friends" starts right now. >> great to be here at "fox & friends." it is the ninth of august, 2013. i'm anna kooiman in for gretchen carlson. >>> a dangerous twist to an already disturbing story. authorities warning the california man who allegedly kidnapped the 16-year-old girl after killing her mother and possib
of the time in which you were raised. i was raised in the '60s and -- >> in mississippi. >> yeah, and i'm a -- not only that a student of my history. i've said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word, i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people i'm connected to, my ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who've come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> i understand lee daniels said that he used to use the word, and you two had a discussion -- >> i said lee, you ain't going to be using that word around me. lee, no you're not going to use that word around me. and i think it's used appropriately in the film. i mean, i thi
in the mississippi river. the missouri supreme court will now decide his fate. walmart has agreed to approve -- improve safety conditions as part of a settlement with federal health and safety regulators. federal inspectors have uncovered what they termed repeat and serious violations at a store in rochester, new york. under the deal, walmart will improve procedures relating to trash compactors and the handling of chemicals and hire an outside monitor to ensure compliance at store locations in 28 states. walmart will also pay $190,000, tiny fraction of its profits which amounted to 17 billion dollars last year. in a statement, the worker group our walmart, which has lisa only -- which has recently led a number of historic strikes, said last month workers at a california warehouse that moose products for walmart launched a two-day strike to protest alleged retaliation after reporting safety issues that included blocked emergency exits, nonfunctioning forklift brakes and a lack of sufficient ventilation, and water under intense heat. japan's prime minister has ordered government action to help
the mississippi, in the middle of no place. a lot of these warehouses are in industrial wasteland areas. people commute from nearby cities from all over. the warehouse i was working in had thousands of people in it. since it was the run-up to christmas, they were hiring 4000 additional temporary workers just for the last four months of the year. from the moment i arrived in town, even before i got to the warehouse, i stopped at the local chamber of commerce, and they told me, do not st crying and do not take what happens to you personally. it is a very ugly scene in their beer there are lots of people who would be willing to take your job because the economy is so bad, so basically put up with what ever they throw at you and leave your dignity at the door. that is what i did and that is what everyone else there did. >> could you talked about what prompted you to get this temporary job, had they become interested in conditions in these types of warehouses? >> i had done another story about the death of the middle class in ohio in the run-up to governor kasich's budget cuts that he was doing, so
first discovered the following places: florida, the pacific ocean and the mississippi river? do those come to the top -- would you know, jon? jon: two of those, i know. jenna: oh, please. jon, of course. if you're like the rest of us -- [laughter] don't feel bad if you're stumped without using the internet. so were we, quite frankly, and to make it worse, these questions are from a test administered to kentucky schools in 1912 to eighth graders. eighth graders. david strange is the executive director of the bullet county history museum located in shepherdsville, kentucky, and the only thing that made me feel sort of okay is knowing that you, the smart guy at the museum, also had to turn to the internet -- [laughter] to find out some of these answers. how difficult was it? >> well, i remember, i actually remember most all of these questions or similar to them being taught and asked when i was in high school -- jenna: oh, come on, you weren't around in 1912, david, please. [laughter] >> no, but when i was in high school, in the '60s and '70s, i remember being taught them. now, rememberi
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
themselves. >> host: on our line for independents. randy in west point, mississippi. >> caller: good morning! >> host: good morning. >> caller: if the ports in savannah, georgia going to be upgraded for the new tanker ships? thank you. >> guest: the the port of savannah is currently in the process of working in the corp. of engineer and the federal government to deepen the savannah river so it will be able to accommodate larger vessel the project is underway in term of that investment and improvement. similarly in gulf port, mississippi. as you know, that port was significantly impacted by katrina a few years ago. as part of the process of rebuilding and revitallyization of the mississippi coastline there's activity involved in terms of improvements and investment in and around the port or gulf port to both revitalize that community that have devastated by the hurricane, but also importantly to be able to handle the new type of vessel that will be transiting in to the gulf of mexico in a few short years. >> we have about fifteen minutes left with our guest. he's the president and chief execu
joined texas, mississippi and alabama in passing strict voter i.d. requirements, a move mrs. clinton says will usher in the old demons of discrimination. >> in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights have been introduced in 31 states. now, not every obstacle is related to race but everyone who says that racial crimination is no longer a problem in american elections must not be paying attention. >> john: the speech delivered before the american bar association, the first of a series of addresses mrs. clinton plans to give this fall, each one addressing a challenge she says is undermining america's faith in government. well, hey, why wait? i'm sure she's just doing it for fun and socialization. here to talk about some of the challenges right now are cenk uygur, host of "the young turks" joining us from los angeles and from d.c., bill press, host of the "bill press show." two of the best minds in the business, my friends. i'm honored you can join us tonight. cenk, let me dive in with you first. there has been a lot of speculation about mrs. clinton's potential campaign. w
on the mississippi border. the gunman eventually let one woman go. but the cops say the guy complained to them that he had voices in his head. and blamed his ex-girlfriend's family for inserting some sort of device in his brain he has mad at people. he was mad at people that he said were mean to him. >> mean to him. the standoff went on for nearly 12 hours. when the suspect told negotiators he was planning to kill his remaining hostages, state police stormed the building. investigators say the gunman shot both of the hostages. killed one, wounded the other. and then police shot him dead i mentioned the cartoon he apparently posted on his facebook several days ago. a police negotiator who can't be bothered to save a hostage. investigators say they also found a list of demands in the gunman's bank. the shooter did not want anybody to arrest him or providemental health treatment. competed to see who could give him the best campaign killers. that accusation today from debbie roe the singer's ex-wife and the mother of two of his children paris and prince. debbie roe testified today as part of a law
and watches in effect all across the southeast in georgia and florida, parts of mississippi and alabama too. it's this stalled front and that moisture coming in off the gulf. it is going to try to make its way in the mid-atlantic. a couple light spotty >> and that's your latest forecast. lester. >> dylan, thanks. up next on "today," oscar pistorius, the double-amputee accused of murdering his high-profile girlfriend making a court appearance tomorrow. that's right after this. i like a clean kitchen. i don't do any cleaning. i make dirt. ♪ very, very heavy. i'm not big enough or strong enough for this. there should be some way to make it easier. [ doorbell rings ] [ morty ] here's a box, babe. open it up. oh my goodness! what is a wetjet? some kind of a mopping device. there's a lot of dirt on here. morty, look at how easy it is. it's almost like dancing. [ both humming ] this is called the swiffer dance. softens the enamel so it can potentially erode. once that enamel is gone, it's gone. my dentist recommended pronamel. pronamel protects your teeth from the effects of acid erosion. i don'
and thunderstorms east of the mississippi. and the heaviest from new york down to the carolinas. >> upper 70s from boston to new york. mostly 80s in the midwest. 90s in the southeast. triple digits from dallas to phoenix. >>> all right. we have approximately 425 million reasons why this is our "favorite story of the day." you probably know why by now? >> simply because tonight's powerball jackpot is now up to at least $425 million. it is the fourth largest top prize in the multistate lottery's history. >> no one has won the jackpot since june 22nd. that's why it's high. as always your chances of winning are 175 million:1. good luck to everyone. especially the commish. of course, he obviously wrote this script for us. >> he wrote the script. >> the script. >> good luck to me. ha-ha. >> hey, someone has got to win, commish. right? >> would you come in the next day if you won? >> not a chance. >> not a chance. not a chance. >> he is with me. >> you say no. >> call out sick. lay low. figure out what i'm going to do. >> i will tell you on television. the dangerous things i would do if i were to become
at the forecast rainfall across the region, across the mississippi river valley and lower ohio valley we could see the potential for heavy rain, special across arkansas an in towards tennessee where we could see 6-12 inches in a very short period of time. still hot, still summertime across the southern plains. 98 in dallas, 98 in shreveport. 98 in houston, what it feels like, it's oppressive. 103 t in houston, 102 in san antonio. they are used this kind of weather. dallas, your forecast average right now is 97 degrees. another day of hundred degree heat and then we'll be slightly below average with some thunderstorms in the forecast. >> gregg: it's beautiful here in new york. it's unbelievable. it's in the 80s. >> spectacular with hardly any humidity. one of those days, we should have called in sick. >> gregg: it's jammed outside on sixth avenue. dominican day parade. great day for it. thanks very much. >> heather: in indonesia meantime, crews are searching for two children after a volcanic eruption, at least six people were killed when lava flowed into a village. the head of disaster agency they
to punish the wrongdoing that occurred. we think next month it will be clear that mississippi and louisiana, in particular, have been dramatically impacted. these duties are warranted to offset the subsidies. ashley: the major buyers of the imported shrimp say we are talking about two different products. what comes in from asia is so far shrimp. is there a distinction there question. >> our shrimp are caught in the gulf of mexico. they are not farm raised. consumers look at them side-by-side. they make a determination on what the prices. though foreign shrimp are less expensive because they are being some guys. ashley: for us, the consumers, and i love my shrimp, does this mean the prices could go up if the tariffs are approved? >> i do not think they will go up. right now there has been some problems in the shipping industry worldwide. it is affecting the quality and the health of the shrimp that is coming in from foreign countries. our domestically caught shrimp are in great shape. we have proven that since the oil spill. all of which have been found to be of the highest-quality. ashley:
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
arkansas. we have flash flood watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river. they stretch west back towards wichita where a flood watch is in effect. the heavy rain is coming down in buckets. we had severe thunderstorm watches this morning. we are seeing the heavy rain now pushing into northwestern arkansas. we have frequent cloud to ground lightning and torrential downs. we'll keep an eye out for flooding for the next several hours. the showers in the northeast brought on by the cold front. clouds with spotty showers. the best chance of stronger storms besides areas in missouri and arkansas will be in eastern colo . >>> we see temperatures around the bay area in the 50s with low clouds and drizzle and mist around san francisco. notice the winds. very strongly onshore and in the north bay. the all day sea breeze. temperatures mostly in the 60s from san francisco to oakland and 70s and 80s south of downtown san jose and low 80s in the trivalley. the trend will continue into monday with a slightly stronger sea breeze that means more cooling early next week. >>> that's your latest
farther to the east, into that lower mississippi valley, as well. as far as the low today, right here, just exiting the rockies, going into those noerns plains. with that, we're going to be looking at the severe weather threat today. extending down through montana, through kansas. we'll be looking for strong thunderstorms. really, we're looking for hail and damaging winds in these areas. then, of course, we have more rain in the southeast. we're looking at another couple of inches of rain into that area. so yes, the big winner, of course, is the northeast. that is where we're seeing temperatures well below normal. it's going to stay that way. you're adding rain to that. i'll take it today. we have the big winners. >> wow. >> thanks. good morning. >>> coming up on new day, up until now, it's just been a fancy name. cyclospora. the big mystery is what is starting it, what is it? officials are ready to talk approximately we'll tell you everything you need to know about this mysterious bug and what's causing it. >> it has been a mystery, for sure. >>> coming up, a daring jail break caught
. louisiana, mississippi, what is happening in some of those states? >> that is an important point, one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. the expert we will hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have gone to the south, other than -- shunned the south, other than texas. that has been a problem. now, you are seeing dixie really attracting a lot of the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states with the biggest percentage increase of immigration over the last 15 years has been georgia. it has become a high-growth state. people at, are immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits, or are they attracted to a state that has jobs? we look at some of the evidence, and what we found was, on balance, immigrants are much more likely to go to states with unemployment rates than they are to go to states with welfare. they are coming here because they want a job, not a welfare check. >> it makes logical sense. if you are to leave your country and make out somewhere new -- >> there are so many people on the other side of the
appendectomy at a hospital in jackson, mississippi. the 71-year-old is expected to make a full recovery. >>anna: 32 minutes after the hour. how do you stop government leaks? get rid of the humans. a new dramatic step that is just being announced by the n.s.a. director at its cyber security conference. the plan, replace computer system administrators with machines. >> what we are in the process of doing, but not fast enough, is reducing our system administrators by about 90% for the first reason, which was to make our networks more defensible and more secure. >>anna: this plan was apparently already in place before the leaks but is now being sped up. >>peter: overnight a wild police chase ends with a suspect's car crashing and flipping over. take a look with us. >> you're going to have to make a turn here. look at this. off to the dirt and through the fence and rolling. >>peter: it happened in california. the man behind the wheel accused of carjacking that kia van. after about 20 minutes he finally got out of the car with a few bumps and bruises and then surrendered to police. any choice? i don'
, your thoughts on the president's remarks yesterday. west mississippi, independent line. caller: i completely agree with the president. mr. snowden is not a patriot. one of the most important thing is facing our country now is this whole issue of fiber security. fibrous security is more important to our nation than the budget deficit problem. it is more important than our dependence on foreign oil. we have to be more aggressive with our cyber security protection. when have to be more aggressive with regard to battling against these groups who want to break into our cyber systems that control everything from our financial markets to our power grids and everything else. houston,ther troy from texas. republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think he is a patriot. the government cannot listen to every phone call and every conversation we have. that information is our private property. we should be able to sell it as we see fit. cyber security is no excuse for setting up being cut or a police state. this is a country and it seems like he is a patriot to me. host: suzanne
. that is a long time in coming. it is beginning at this time. >> headers on the phone from jackson,, mississippi. what is your question? >> i would like to know who ran against james k. polk when he as running for president and did sarah polk play the part? >> polk runs against henry clay from kentucky. clay had run twice again before this. he thinks it is his turn. he expects it will be a cake walk, because nobody has heard of jim spoke. he makes a number of mistakes during the campaign, and in the end, in a very close vote, clay loses to polk. oddly enough, he carries polk's home state. >> the issue of a presidential campaign at that time, very different from what we see today. it was considered a proper for the candidate to be called to office. active campaigning went to state offices like the governor. the candidates did not show up at the nominating conventions, afterwards when the were drafted and accepted the nomination, air with letters and the editor, but very little stump -- no stumping at all. sarah was her husband's campaign manager for his congressional campaign and gubernatorial ca
of the mississippi, 800 square miles right here in the middle of california. these cotton growers from the south were chased out by the bull weasel, came last and they claim this land, this blakely and. they took the rivers and dams them and shoved to the flow to places where they wanted to go cotton. at some point they had to go find labor. a number of folks came to the basin and their nerd is played out here. quite okies, bitchiness and black okies. no one had ever written about lack okies. they came in the 40s when this cotton picker was started in the fields. it could take the middle swath of the fields in the 40s and 50s, but it could not take the edge of the rows. so the black okies were working across the machine that would eventually idle them, picking the edges of the cotton and in 10 years time they were idled. the women ended up becoming mates and housekeepers for wealthy white farmers, much like the south. and the men, where they occurred, found work. many of them were idled. the children left this place. when we came upon it, it was mostly old folks. when i wrote my last book, west of th
collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the senate passed a bipartisan
in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host of this tweet -- -- host: this tweet -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a secret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total population are using the h2a
that residents of utah, california and massachusetts google the most. people in mississippi, arkansas and west virginia google the least. >> the testing company act says just a quarter of this year's high school graduates who took the act tests have the reading, math, english and science skills they need to succeed in college or a career. the results indicate that thousands of students graduate from high schools without the knowledge necessary for the next steps in life. the data also show a downturn in overall student scores, although company officials attribute the slide to updated standards and more students taking the exams - including those with no intention of attending two- or four-year colleges. >> kia is recalling more than 9,700 suvs in the u.s. and canada because the front axle can fail and the vehicles can lose power. the recall affects 2014 sorento suvs with 2.4-liter four-cylinder engines and front-wheel-drive. they were built from jan. 7 through march 12 of this year. kia says the right axle drive shaft can crack and fail. if that happens, the suvs can lose power or roll away wh
to the summer of 1955 to the killing of emma ll. a 14-year-old african-american boy, and went to mississippi to be with an spawn uncle and cousin and is lynched. dragged out of the bed in the middle of the night by a white bomb and -- mob and ends up in the body of the river. when emma's body was found, -- emmett was 14, she was 14 when she dee integrated the central high school in, a. but emmett, when his body was sent back to chicago, his mother, maimy till, wasn't an activist, she was forced into this. losing her only child. she said she wanted the casket open for the wake and the funeral. she wanted the world to see the ravages of racism. the brutality of big industry. thousands streamed by his casket and saw, and then jet magazine, another black publication, took photographed of the disextendded, mutilated head, and they were published and seared into the history and consciousness of this country. she had something very important to teach the press. show the pictures. show the images. cue imagine if for just one week we saw the images of war, every newspaper had a picture of a dead baby
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